SOPs

Animals Administered a Hazardous Substance Requiring Containment

Research activities may involve the administration of hazardous substances to laboratory animals. If not contained properly, these activities can negatively impact the health of research and animal care personnel as well as other animals. This document outlines procedures to be utilized by personnel working with animals exposed to hazardous substances in ABSL-2 containment rooms (not including radioactive materials, see Related Documents section). Some procedures described in this SOP may not be applicable for non-rodent species, contact ULAM husbandry supervisors for further information. Extra precautions must be taken at the time of agent administration due to the increased potential for human exposure. Individuals who may be at an increased risk or susceptibility to a hazardous substance must be identified through Environmental Health & Safety's (EHS) medical surveillance process (e.g., pregnant women, immune compromised individuals). This SOP has been reviewed and approved by EHS with full consideration of all regulations. If further information is needed that is not found in this SOP, contact EHS. Any deviations from this SOP will need to be approved by EHS.
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SOPs

Entry and Exiting Animal Housing Areas

Procedures for entry and exiting animal housing areas, including: handling or changing scrubs and showering.
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SOPs

Macaque Monkey Bite, Scratch, Exposure SOP

Herpes B virus is carried by monkeys in the genus Macaca, such as the rhesus (Macaca mulatta), cynomolgus (M, fascicularis), pigtail macaque (M. nemestrina) and other Asiatic macaque species. The virus can be transmitted from these monkeys to humans through exposure to the animal's saliva or other body fluids or tissues. Most infections have been contracted through skin injuries such as bites, scratches, needle sticks or lacerations or through splashes of body substances into mucous membranes like the conjuncitva of the eye. The stability of the virus on cage surfaces is not known but such contaminated surfaces must be considered as possible sources of infection.  Infected monkeys generally show no signs of illness or may have oral ulcers similar to "cold sores". It is nearly impossible to determine whether a particular monkey is carrying or shedding B virus. Therefore, all macaque monkeys should be treated as though infected and their bodily fluids and soiled cages should be handled as if they were contaminated.
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Policies

Policy on Personal Hygiene Requirements When Conducting Animal Activities

This policy implements the importance hygiene practices that must be followed to mitigate risks against zoonotic agents found naturally in experimental animals as well as hazardous materials used experimentally in approved studies.
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Policies

Policy on Personal Protective Equipment While Conducting Animal Activities

This policy defines the minimum standards of personal protective equipment (PPE) needed to control or prevent exposure to zoonotic organisms and allergens inherent in the animals as well as hazardous materials exposures due to research activities.
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Policies

Policy on the Animal Handler Medical Surveillance Program

This policy implements a necessary and comprehensive Animal Handler Medical Surveillance program to address health risks such as allergens and zoonoses.
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Policies

Policy on the Use of Hazardous Materials in Animal Activities

This policy enacts those provisions of the following federal and state requirements pertaining to the use of hazardous materials in research, teaching, and testing activities that involve vertebrate animals.
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SOPs

Procedures for Dog, Cat or Ferret Bites or Scratches

The following SOP details the procedures to follow at the University of Michigan in the event that a dog, cat, or ferret bites someone. This SOP follows the "May 2008 Rabies Protocol for Mammals Which Have Bitten People or Pets" and associated information, as distributed by the Michigan Veterinary Medical Association.
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